Updating my resume

“In today’s job market, your resume needs to immediately stand out,” says Dawn Bugni, a professional resume writer in Wilmington, N. Attention spans are at an all-time short, with hiring managers spending just six seconds looking at a resume before deciding whether the applicant is worth further consideration, a recent study by The Ladders found.

Depending on the industry, you can distinguish your resume by punching up the design, but exercise caution: a graphic artist, for example, has more creative leeway than an accountant.Enelow’s co-author Louise Kursmark recommends using color to make your resume unique.To stay professional, consider making only section headers blue, for example, and leaving the rest in black, Kursmark suggests.And replace the outdated Times New Roman with a more modern font such as Cambria, Calibri, or Georgia, Enelow says.(As standard typefaces, they translate well between operating systems.) Today’s hiring managers aren’t concerned with what is it you’re looking for—they’re focused on finding the right hire.

Thus, “the objective statement has become obsolete,” says Tiffani Murray, an HR professional and resume writer at Atlanta-based Personality On a Page.

To capture the hiring manager’s attention, start your resume with a short professional synopsis that states your years of experience, job history, and big career achievements.

Instead of labeling the section a “summary,” use the header to highlight your area of expertise, says Enelow.

The Internet has changed reading behavior, says Kursmark: “People don’t read top to bottom anymore.

They’re constantly skimming and looking at different parts of the page, and if you don’t structure your resume to appeal to that, a lot of good material will get overlooked.” Therefore, use bolded text to ensure your achievements stand out.

Many medium and large companies use software to weed out candidates.