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That's why and Everytown are partnering for a campaign called Singled Out, to raise awareness among unmarried women of the risk for gun violence and the gaps in the law. "It's crucial that single women understand the risk factors and tackle talking directly about the role guns may play in their daily lives," says Watts.

The first two were from a detective from the Phoenix Police Department.

Estes's mind started racing — her sons were asleep at her home, and she had just seen Shayley, her 22-year-old daughter, the day before at the air-conditioning company where Shayley worked as a manager.

The third message was from a woman who said, "I'm very sorry for your loss.

"You've watched pundits and politicos debate the issue. For Jessica, a 26-year-old in Sheridan, Illinois, shooting is a shared interest with her fiancé. "I know that he's responsible." But some women don't even know where to start the conversation.

Maybe you've joined in the hashtag chorus, whether #Not One More or #Pro Gun. And those weapons are three times as likely to be owned by a man than a woman, according to a 2013 Pew Research Center report. Emily, a 21-year-old college student in Baltimore, says that "most younger people have similar views on issues like sex and birth control so those are generally less controversial topics.

But in order to truly save lives, the conversation has to get intimate. But a lot of people my age have different views on guns, so it's something that I'd be less likely to talk about openly."talked to some women who love guns, some who loathe them, and a lot in between.

"We need to start talking about gun safety in our relationships — now," says Rob Valente, vice president of policy for the National Domestic Violence Hotline. And every woman agreed that she would want to know if the man she was dating owned a firearm.

"I don't want to look in a drawer for a towel and instead find a gun," says Crystal, 23, who lives in New York City and is dating a police officer.

Hudson, a 21-year-old student from Orono, Minnesota, agrees.

"I'd be alarmed if he did not feel comfortable talking about it," she says. While no one wants to imagine her partner would hurt her, the stats tell another truth: 1 in 3 women will experience abuse in her lifetime, according to the CDC. And when a gun is present in a domestic-violence situation, a study in the found, it raises a woman's risk for being killed by 500 percent.

Single women are especially vulnerable, because laws give them less protection than married women, argues Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, part of the gun-violence prevention group Everytown for Gun Safety. Bringing up guns can be awkward, but as with abortion and STIs, you should know where your partner stands.