Free chat with grandmother online

With a firmly approving nod, and an “I know what you mean” smile, a young lady in her early 20s and a gentleman in his mid-30s agreed. Home-cooked food, at the table of a grandmother in Tanta.My grandparents lived in Tanta too,” said the young lady.Because it is an inviting a menu, the two ladies and the gentleman, all hungry, take their time with its divisions of (cows feet).

Consequently, the three who were hoping for a dip into their grandmothers’ dishes agree to dismiss the shish-tawouks and the cutlets.They also agree to order the kind of variety their grandmothers would offer: some cold starters; boiled and spiced potato cubes; boiled black lentils; a green salad.“We used to have the boiled black lentils as a meal in and by itself that would be served with olive oil, (common) bread at the house of my other grandmother — the one who lived in Cairo,” said the middle-aged lady.Get caregiving tips, advice, and support with Caring.com's online support groups. To help keep this a safe and supportive place for all caregivers, please review our Community Guidelines.Connect with those who understand what you're going through. If you have any questions or need help with your free member account, please get in touch with our Community Team.

El-Seit Hosniyah could safely be translated as “Chez la grand-maman,” because when the food is brought out it instantly brings back memories of a grandma’s lunch table.Those who have to eat out often will know exactly that feeling of a sudden craving for home-cooked food, in abundance and in a diversity that goes beyond what has customarily been a stew of potato and veal cubes with white rice and a mixed green salad on the side.It could hit several people who work or hang out together for their meals at the same time.It could happen around 3pm, when El-Seit Hosniyah is about to serve the many dishes it has on its colourful and inviting menu.“The menu is good enough, or maybe it is bad enough, to make one really hungry.It looks like it has come out of my grandmother’s lunch table in Tanta all those decades ago,” said one clearly starved lady in her late forties to two younger lunch companions.