Egypt sexchat

The bloodshed in Egypt drove about two dozen Egyptian-Canadians onto Calgary streets Thursday, demanding Canada take a tougher line against their homeland’s military rulers.

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“I would like to see more action from the Canadian government.” At least one of the protesters hoisted photos of Morsi, but Hassanin said their anger was more over what he called the crushing of Egyptian democracy than political allegiance.“Most of these people have no political affiliation,” he said.“When you remove democratically-elected institutions there’s no need for votes or for that institution.” Attacks on Christian churches, he said, are a sad retaliation for the Egyptian military’s crimes, though the scope of those is magnified by the country’s “a corrupt media.” He acknowledged there is a portion of the Egyptian community in Calgary that supports the military’s actions, but said their voices have faded as the situation’s worsened in the North African country.Hassanin, who still has family in Egypt, said many of his compatriots in Calgary are yearning to return to their homeland to fight for democracy.“Every one of us would like to go back and join — this is the least we can do to show support for the people there,” he said.

[email protected] Twitter: @SUNBill Kaufmann The bloodshed in Egypt drove about two dozen Egyptian-Canadians onto Calgary streets Thursday, demanding Canada take a tougher line against their homeland’s military rulers.Egyptian journalist Mouna el-Iraqi brought a film crew and police into a Turkish bath in the heart of Cairo.Shown here the moment the officers who arrested 21 young men at the bath.(Photo: video screenshot) Egypt’s morality police recently arrested “a sexual deviant” who offered his services via the Internet.A police officer acted as an agent provocateur, talking him up on a sex chat site. While many countries clamp down on prostitution, Egypt doesn’t only crack down on sex for sale but on anyone whose sexual practices are not heterosexual.Anyone in the LGBT community is simply not safe in Egypt, according to Reda Eldanbouki, who heads the non-profit Women’s Center for Guidance and Legal Awareness.