Companies with abusive or intimidating behavior

the lack of unifying language to name the phenomenon of workplace bullying is a problem because without a unifying term or phrase, individuals have difficulty naming their experiences of abuse, and therefore have trouble pursuing justice against the bully.

Bullied people are labeled as insubordinate when they resist the bullying treatment.

There is no exact definition for bullying behaviors in workplace, which is why different terms and definitions are common.

For example, mobbing is a commonly used term in France and Germany, where it refers to a “mob” of bullies, rather than a single bully; this phenomenon is not often seen in other countries.

It can include such tactics as verbal, nonverbal, psychological, physical abuse and humiliation.

This type of workplace aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical school bully, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society.

In the majority of cases, bullying in the workplace is reported as having been by someone in authority over the target.

However, bullies can also be peers, and occasionally subordinates. It may be missed by superiors; it may be known by many throughout the organization.

Negative effects are not limited to the targeted individuals, and may lead to a decline in employee morale and a change in organizational culture.

This distinguishes bullying from isolated behaviours and other forms of job stress and allows the term workplace bullying to be applied in various contexts and to behaviours that meet these characteristics.

Many observers agree that bullying is often a repeated behavior.

However, some experts who have dealt with a great many people who report abuse also categorize some once-only events as bullying, for example with cases where there appear to be severe sequelae.