Chatbot for anal masturbation

Disruption of these pathways frequently results in involuntary movements.

Capitalizing on this finding, pharmaceutical companies developed drugs affecting the dopamine system, which have grown into the primary treatment for RLS.

By flooding the brain with dopamine before you go to bed, muscles relax and the burning-spasm cycle subsides.

Chatbot for anal masturbation-30

Luis Marin and his team at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil, picked up on this dopamine-RLS link, making a logical extension: Masturbation can cause an orgasm and an orgasm releases dopamine and dopamine can calm RLS; therefore, masturbation may also calm RLS.

And as he reports in April’s , that’s exactly what happened when a 41-year-old man with RLS masturbated.

Granted, Marin only found that the man’s legs calmed down after masturbation: The dopamine-mediated chain of events between masturbation and relief are (educated) speculations.

Annas Fun is a true amateur site ran by Anna and her husband Todd.

They are true swingers that get into everything from interracial, female on male strap-on, anal, creampies and more.

RLS is a neurological disorder that afflicts upwards of 10% of people in the U. and Europe: As RLS-sufferers try to sleep, their legs experience burning, tickling, aching, and itching sensations; these uncomfortable feelings build up until the leg spasms out of control.

New research suggests that orgasm—by any means possible—may be a good way to alleviate the condition.

To those suffering with restless leg syndrome (RLS), these are nightly afflictions.

This cycle repeats throughout the night, writes au Technology Editor Peter Farquhar, and “it’s not unusual for people who suffer RLS …

to describe it as torturous.” So why do some people’s legs do this?

According to the NIH, “in most cases, the cause of RLS is unknown,” though “it may have a genetic component.” Nevertheless, experts do have some inkling of the cause, as the NIH reports on their website: Considerable evidence suggests that RLS is related to a dysfunction in the brain’s basal ganglia circuits that use the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is needed to produce smooth, purposeful muscle activity and movement.